“THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME”   

    “THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME” 

 by Mark Haddon (book)   and Simon Stephens (play)

At the Limelight Hotel, Monday, March 12th and Tuesday, March 13th, 7PM sharp!

Ever had one of those days in the city when you feel like you forgot to put your skin on?  Sure you have.  It happens when you haven’t slept, or you drank too much the night before, or you’ve been brooding over bad news.  All your senses, it seems, have been heightened to a painful acuity; your nerve endings are standing on guard. And every one of the manifold sights and sounds of urban life registers as a personal assault. You’re a walking target in a war zone, and that subway ride that awaits you looms like a descent into hell.  This is one of the most fully immersive works ever to wallop Broadway.  As we follow Christopher’s attempts to solve a local mystery — the murder of the dog next door — Mr. Stephens employs an assortment of narrative devices to keep us in his mind.

So be prepared to have all your emotional and sensory buttons pushed, including a few you may not have known existed. It forces you to adopt, wholesale, the point of view of someone with whom you may initially feel you have little in common. That’s Christopher Boone, a 15-year-old mathematical genius for whom walking down the street or holding a conversation is a herculean challenge.  Christopher is in some ways a parent’s nightmare. He hates being touched, is bewildered by the common clichés of small talk and is sent into cataclysmic tantrums by any violation of his rigidly ritualized world.  But he has a distinct advantage over most of us, and he knows it. “I see everything,” he says while looking out the window during the first train ride of his life. “Most other people are lazy”.

A  special-education teacher, Siobhan becomes an intermediary between Christopher, her student, and the audience. In the first act, she reads to us from Christopher’s diary-like account, which he has evidently written at her request.  At the beginning of the second act, she makes it clear that she has persuaded Christopher to turn his story into a play.  The people around him, embodied by a winning ensemble of everyday chameleons are his personal preconceptions of their real-life prototypes. We all employ a similar translation process in dealing with others, whether we acknowledge it or not.  And like Christopher, we are all continually trying to impose internal symmetry on the bewildering world outside. The great achievement of “Curious Incident” lies in how it turns the stage into the ordering mechanism of Christopher’s mind.

THE CAST:

Christopher…………………………………………………………………………………………Beckler Thomas

Siobhan…………………………………………………………………………………………….…..Laurie Strand

Ed…………………………………………………………………………………………………………Joel Vilinsky

Judy………………………………………………………………………………………………..…….Lyn Crandall

Voice 1/Mrs. Shears/Mrs. Gascoyne/and others………………………………………………Shawnna Schmidt

Voice 2/Roger Shears/Duty Sergeant/Mr. Wise/and others…………………………………………Rhett Jones

Voice 3/Policeman/Mr. Thompson/Drunk Two/and others…………………………………..…….John Thomas

Voice 4/Reverend Peters/Uncle Terry/Station Policeman/and others……………………………Gary Hoffman

Voice 5/Neighbor at #40/Lady in Street/Information/and others………………………..…Christina Cernansky

Voice 6/Mrs. Alexander/Posh Woman/and others……………………………………………….…….Mother Lea

The cast ‘Bios’ include a high school student; a school counselor; 3 teachers in the Wood River Valley; a dance instructor and actress; the CEO of Blaine County NAMI; a retired pediatrician; a property manager; and Mother Lea, the Priest at Emmanuel  Episcopal Church in Hailey.

We would like to profusely thank the Limelight Hotel for their extreme generosity and civic-mindedness.

Also, a big recognition for Jay Cutler who is responsible for the sound, light, and music this evening.